Graduate Course Schedules

Emory Sociology provides an extensive curriculum for our graduate students. You will find below the topical courses and individualized programs offered in Fall 2018. Click on each one to see additional information, such as the course description.

You can also click on the links in the sidebar to see our course offerings in other semesters.

Research Method/Models: Statistics (SOC 500) - Jeff Mullis

Wednesday 1:00-4:00 pm

Tarbutton Hall 206

Description:

This course is an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics for bivariate and multivariate analyses.  The course will help you understand statistics reported in social science publications and in the news media as well as help you conduct original research.  The overall goal is to increase your statistical literacy – your ability to create, interpret, and critically evaluate statistical evidence.  This is a set of skills that you will find highly useful in your current academic life and future careers.  It is also a valuable set of skills for virtually everyone in modern society.  As the pioneering health care reformer Florence Nightingale put it over 100 years ago, statistics "is the most important science in the whole world: for upon it depends the practical application of every other science and of every art; the one science essential to all political and social administration, all education, all organization based upon experience, for it only gives the results of our experience."

Required Text: 

ISBN: 9780134507101 Statistical Methods for the Social Sciences, 5th edition (2018).  Alan Agresti. (Pearson) 

Grading: Take-home computer based assignments

Research Methods/Models: Design (SOC 501) - Irene Browne

Tuesday/Thursday 11:30-12:45 pm

Tarbutton Hall 206

Description:

The aim of this course is to teach the fundamentals of research design and the techniques of data collection used in sociological research. By the end of the course, students should be able to:

1) design and execute their own research projects and 2} understand, analyze and critique empirical studies in the sociological literature.

With attention to the debates over social science methodologies, the course takes a practical, "hands-on" approach to research methods. As a class, we will construct a study to assess the TATTO program for the Laney Graduate School. Through in-class exercises and assignments, we will collect and analyze the data and produce a report for the Laney Graduate School. Students in the course will also be required to design and implement their own study. Regular assignments throughout the semester will assist you in following the steps of the research process for your own research so that you can produce an empirical paper at the end of the semester. You will also be required to become certified in human subject’s research at Emory by taking the on-line CITI course.

Required Texts:

1) ISBN: 9780534528614 Analyzing Social Settings, Lofland, Lofland and Snow. 4th Edition. (Wadsworth)

2) ISBN: 9780226891286 The Total Survey Error Approach, Herbert Weisberg. (University of Chicago)

Social Stratification (SOC 515) - Sabino Kornrich

Monday 5:30-8:30

Tarbutton Hall 206

Description:

Offers a thorough overview of leading perspectives on class, race, and gender inequality. Focuses especially on influential books on inequality from the past 20 years.

Required Text:

TBA

Sociology of Health & Illness (SOC 531) - Ellen Idler

Wednesday 9:00am-12:00pm

Tarbutton Hall 206

Description:

This course will provide graduate students with a survey of research on the social origins of the health and illness of individuals and populations.  Students will be introduced to the process of formulating important social research questions in health and illness, including attention to major theoretical perspectives, measurement of concepts, the merits of various study designs, and both qualitative and quantitative approaches to data collection and analysis.  The sociology of health and illness is a large and historically important subdiscipline within the field, distinctively sociological, but with important links to public health, social epidemiology, and health psychology.  

Regular class sessions will include: an introductory lecture on background concepts, theory, or methods; discussion of assigned chapters or articles that have been read by the class and are critiqued by individual students; a “Minute for Books” with a focus on nonfiction accounts of illness; and a “Minute for Media”, with a focus on recent health news.  The final two weeks of the semester will be devoted to the presentation of student projects.

Perspectives on Mental Health (SOC 532) - Corey Keyes

Monday/Wednesday 1:00-2:15 pm

Tarbutton Hall 206

Description:

This course entertains two broad questions within which numerous models, theories, and empirical studies are employed. First, what is the nature and burden of mental illnesses and the benefits of mental health? Second, what are the causes of mental illnesses and mental health? This course employs a bio–psycho–social causal model of health. It therefore examines mental health in terms of its proximal (biological), medial (psychological), and the distal, contributing (sociological) causes. This course is intended to train students to be theoretically–driven, interdisciplinary scholars of ‘public’ mental health.

Required Text:

ISBN: 978-1316500965 Teresa L. Scheid and Tony N. Brown, Editors. 2017. A Handbook for the Study of Mental Health: Social Contexts, Theories, and Systems., New York: Cambridge University Press.

 

Evaluations in Social Interaction (SOC 553) - Karen Hegtvedt

Tuesday 2:00-5:00 pm

Tarbutton Hall 206

Description:

How do people perceive and evaluate others and themselves? What role do evaluations play in stimulating emotions? How do evaluations of outcomes, procedures, and interpersonal treatment stimulate action? This course first addresses a critical process underlying interaction and other types of evaluations: social cognition. The second part of the course notes how cognitive and physiological factors affect emotional experiences and expressions, which have consequences for interaction. Both cognitions and emotions are fundamental features of justice processes, which constitute the third part of the class. Questions will focus on the antecedents and consequences of both distributive, procedural, and interactional justice in social interaction.

Required Text:

1) selected readings available on course Canvas site; 2) ISBN: 978-1446258156 Social Cognition: From Brains to Culture, by Susan Fiske and Shelley Taylor, McGraw Hill, 2013 (available from Amazon.com)

Particulars:

Presentation on readings, one essay exam, research paper, paper critiques. (Note: in lieu of the research paper, students may take two additional essay exams.)

 

 

Advanced Network Analysis (SOC 585) - Weihua An

Tuesday 5:00-8:00 pm

Tarbutton Hall 206

Description:

Interest in network analysis has EXPLODED in the past few years, partly due to the latest advancements in statistical modeling and the rapid availability of network data and partly due to the recognition that many analytical problems can be re-cast as a network problem. Aiming to examine social connections and interactions from structural perspectives, network analysis has become an essential method and tool for studying a variety of issues in social and natural sciences, such as friendship formation, peer influence, social inequality, career mobility, social marketing, organizational competition, economic development, political alliance, diffusion of innovations, contagion of health outcomes, and even protein interactions, to name only a few. This course covers the major methods to collect, represent, and analyze network data. Selected topics include centrality analysis, positional analysis, clustering analysis, the exponential random graph model for modeling network formations, the stochastic actor-oriented model for dynamic network analysis, meta network analysis, weighted network analysis, text network analysis, causal analysis of network effects, and social network-based predictions and interventions. Examples are drawn from a wide range of disciplines including business, economics, education, political science, public health, and sociology. Students will learn hands-on skills to conduct their own research by using popular network packages in R such as “statnet” and “RSiena”. This course requires a basic knowledge of logistic regression. Programming in R is preferred.

Directed Study (SOC 597R or SOC 797R)

These offer credit for individualized work with a given faculty member.

Please consult with your advisor and / or Dr. Ellen Idler, our Director of Graduate Studies), about enrollment.

MA Research (SOC 599R) or PhD Research (SOC 799R)

These offer credit for ongoing research overseen by a given faculty member.

Please consult with your advisor and / or Dr. Ellen Idler, our Director of Graduate Studies), about enrollment.

Teaching Assistantships (TATT 605SOC & TATT 610SOC)

These offer credit for participation in assistantships (TATT 605C) and for teaching one's own class (TATT 610SOC).

Read more about these credits here.