Fall 2017

Emory Sociology provides an extensive curriculum for our graduate students. You will find below the topical courses and individualized programs offered in Fall 2017. Click on each one to see additional information, such as the course description.

You can also click on the links in the sidebar to see our course offerings in other semesters.

Research Method/Models: Statistics (SOC 500) - Jeff Mullis

Tuesday 12:00-3:00 pm

Tarbutton Hall 206

Course Description:

This course is an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics for bivariate and multivariate analyses.  The course will help you understand statistics reported in social science publications and in the news media as well as help you conduct original research.  The overall goal is to increase your statistical literacy – your ability to create, interpret, and critically evaluate statistical evidence.  This is a set of skills that you will find highly useful in your current academic life and future careers.  It is also a valuable set of skills for virtually everyone in modern society.  As the pioneering health care reformer Florence Nightingale put it over 100 years ago, statistics "is the most important science in the whole world: for upon it depends the practical application of every other science and of every art; the one science essential to all political and social administration, all education, all organization based upon experience, for it only gives the results of our experience."

Required Text: 

ISBN: 9780134507101: Statistical Methods for the Social Sciences, 5th edition (2018).  Alan Agresti. (Pearson) 

Grading: 

Take-home computer based assignments

Research Methods/Models: Design (SOC 501) - Irene Browne

Mon-Wed 10:00-11:15 am

Tarbutton Hall 206

Course Description:

The aim of this course is to teach the fundamentals of research design and the techniques of data collection used in sociological research. By the end of the course, students should be able to:

1) design and execute their own research projects and 2} understand, analyze and critique empirical studies in the sociological literature.

With attention to the debates over social science methodologies, the course takes a practical, "hands-on" approach to research methods. As a class, we will construct a study to assess the TATTO program for the Laney Graduate School. Through in-class exercises and assignments, we will collect and analyze the data and produce a report for the Laney Graduate School. Students in the course will also be required to design and implement their own study. Regular assignments throughout the semester will assist you in following the steps of the research process for your own research so that you can produce an empirical paper at the end of the semester. You will also be required to become certified in human subject’s research at Emory by taking the on-line CITI course.

Required Texts:

ISBN: 9780534528614: Analyzing Social Settings, Lofland, Lofland and Snow. 4th Edition. (Wadsworth)

ISBN: 9780226891286: The Total Survey Error Approach, Herbert Weisberg. (University of Chicago)

Religion and Public Health (SOC 534) - Ellen Idler

Tuesday 9:00am-12:00pm

Tarbutton Hall 206

Course Description:

This course will provide masters and doctoral level students with an interdisciplinary survey of research and writing on the public health implications of religious practices, beliefs, and institutions.  The course will emphasize evidence from quantitative social science and epidemiology and the role of religion in the historical development of public health institutions to identify religion’s role as a social determinant of health.

Required Text:

ISBN: 9780199362219: Religion as a Social Determinant of Public Health, Ellen Idler, Editor. 2014. (New York: Oxford University Press)  

Sociology of Culture (SOC 560) - Timothy J. Dowd

Thursday 5:00-8:00 pm

Tarbutton Hall 206

Course Description:

The course (1) provides students with grounding in cultural sociology and (2) prepares students for doing their own cultural research. To facilitate the first objective, we survey major themes and issues in the sociology of culture. We begin this survey by considering the sociological approach to culture, which entails answering the following questions: “What is culture and what does it do?” and “How are we to study culture?” We get at these broad questions via the case of music. We next turn to issues that Marx, Weber, and Durkheim respectively raised. In particular, we inspect how current scholars (from a variety of theoretical perspectives) approach these seminal issues. Examples of issues that spring from the work of classical sociologists include the following: “Do media messages shape our view of reality? If so, how?” and “How do class and lifestyle intertwine to reproduce inequality?” Finally, we turn to substantive questions that have come to the fore in recent decades, including “How is market activity undergirded by cultural assumptions?” and “How does social context shape the production and consumption of expressive goods?” To facilitate the second objective (i.e., doing research), we give special attention to methods and designs employed in current research, and we heed how theoretical ideas are translated into empirical projects. Thus, by the end of the semester, each student will have a grasp of the field and an understanding of how to do cultural sociology.

Required Texts:

All readings will be posted as PDFs in our Online Reserves system

Culture & Social Psychology Empirical Research Workshop SOC 563) - Timothy J. Dowd

Friday 1:00-4:00 pm

Tarbutton Hall 206

Course description:

This bi-weekly workshop focuses on teaching graduate students how to produce research, ranging from the initial design of a study to eventual submission for publication. The following types of graduate students will be eligible for participation in the workshop: (a) those who specialize in culture and/or social psychology; and (b) those who are currently involved in some stage of the research process (e.g., beginning a project, revising a paper, conducting data analysis, working on a dissertation proposal). Throughout the semester, we will address the particular efforts of each student.  Each workshop member will provide constructive comments at our meetings.

Required Texts:

All readings will be posted as PDFs in our Online Reserves system

Sociology of Education (SOC 579R) - Cassidy Puckett

Tuesday 3:00-6:00 pm

Tarbutton Hall 206

Course Description:

This course focuses on education and its relationship to social inequality. The goals of the course are to: 1) provide students with a foundation in the literature on formal and informal education and 2) prepare students to engage in their own research in education. To do so, we will first look at educational experiences from pre-school through through college to consider how social class, race, gender, and sexuality both organize and are organized by these educational environments—and the factors that contribute to inequalities in learning, educational attainment, and life outcomes such as earnings and health. In this survey, we will also consider several issues such as racial segregation and desegregation, tracking, school choice, technological interventions, and more. As we investigate these issues, we will attend to the theoretical, substantive, methodological, and political considerations that concern the study of education. Finally, to apply these ideas, students will engage in a research project in education using a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods approach.

Teaching Sociology (SOC 767) - Frank Lechner

Thursday 1:00-4:00 pm

Tarbutton Hall 206

Course Description:

Through discussion of major issues in teaching and with a variety of exercises, this seminar will help you prepare for your first teaching assignment and enhance your effectiveness as a teacher.

Directed Study (SOC 597R or SOC 797R)

These offer credit for individualized work with a given faculty member.

Please consult with your advisor and / or Dr. Ellen Idler, our Director of Graduate Studies), about enrollment.

MA Research (SOC 599R) or PhD Research (SOC 799R)

These offer credit for ongoing research overseen by a given faculty member.

Please consult with your advisor and / or Dr. Ellen Idler, our Director of Graduate Studies), about enrollment.

Teaching Assistantships (TATT 605SOC & TATT 610SOC)

These offer credit for participation in assistantships (TATT 605C) and for teaching one's own class (TATT 610SOC).

Read more about these credits here.