Spring 2019

Emory Sociology provides an extensive curriculum for our graduate students. You will find below the topical courses and individualized programs offered in Spring 2019. Click on each one to see additional information, such as the course description.

You can also click on the links in the sidebar to see our course offerings in other semesters.

Applied Regression (SOC 506) - Sabino Kornrich

Tuesday 9:30-12:30

Tarbutton Hall 206

Course Description:

This course covers the topic of regression analysis in sociology. This includes the basics of diagnostics, errors, and dealing with collinearity. After covering ordinary least squares, the class moves into nonlinear dependent variables, including regression models for categorical dependent variables like logistic regression and poisson regression. The course focuses on the interpretation of results, with particular emphasis on visualization to aid understanding of complex statistical models and nonlinear relationships.

Required text:

ISBN: 978-0521686891 Data Analysis Using Regression and Multilevel/Hierarchical Models 1st Edition by Andrew Gelman (Author), Jennifer Hill (Author)

Sociology of Mass Media (SOC 562) - Tim Dowd

Thursday 5:30-8:30

Tarbutton Hall 206

Course Description:

The course (1) provides students with grounding in media sociology and (2) prepares students for doing their own media research.

To facilitate the first objective, we survey the media literature that spans a number of disciplines, which includes (but is not limited to) sociology, communications, and history. In pursuing this survey, we touch upon the following themes: (a) We examine how various media industries are organized and how such organization is sometimes transformed by regulation, competition, and/or technology. This examination includes both “old” (e.g., film) and “new” media (e.g., social media, streaming video on demand). (b) We focus on the careers of workers within media industries, connecting the constraints of their work environments to the type of content the produce.  (c) We inspect media content and investigate factors that promote stability, change, and diversity – including online content. (c) We address the consumers of mass media products and inspect how they utilize and are shaped by media content, as well as how they are also sometimes the producers of content.

To facilitate the second objective (i.e., doing research), we give special attention to methods and designs employed in current research, and we heed how theoretical ideas are translated into empirical projects. This second objective is especially crucial in an age where “big data” techniques have expanded greatly sociological research on mass media. Thus, by the end of the semester, each student will have a grasp of the field and an understanding of how to do media sociology.

Particulars:

This course is organized as a seminar, which entails the combination of a fair amount of reading, class discussion, and written assignments. Given this organization, you are expected to attend each class and to participate.

All the readings will be available via online reserves.

A final paper is required that integrates a student’s intellectual concerns with the relevant materials covered in this seminar

Qualitative Methods (SOC 585) - Cassidy Puckett

Monday 5:30-8:30

Tarbutton Hall 206

Course Description:

In this course, we will investigate what it means to utilize qualitative methods in social science research. To do so, we will 1) examine the epistemological underpinnings of qualitative research; 2) consider issues such as subjectivity, ethics, validity, rigor, and causality; 3) practice various qualitative data collection and analysis methods; and 4) discuss practical issues such as framing and operationalizing research questions, designing feasible projects, selecting samples, managing data collection and analysis, presenting and publishing findings, and pursuing funding for qualitative research. The goal of the course is for students to develop the skills, techniques, and knowledge necessary to design and undertake independent qualitative research (and/or mixed methods research)—or to be sufficiently conversant in qualitative methods to engage with qualitative scholarship in the social sciences. The final outcome of the course is that students walk away with an initial experience in qualitative research methods as well as a draft of a grant proposal for the National Science Foundation or some other equivalent that uses qualitative or mixed methods.

Gender and Violence (SOC 585) - Kathryn Yount

Friday 2:00-5:00

CNR 4001

Course Description:

Alternating Spring. This course provides an overview of theories, case studies, and interventions related to gender-based violence, with a focus on lower-income settings and populations. Students are exposed to major theories that have advanced an understanding of the multilevel, social-ecological determinants of GBV, and the implications of GBV for adverse health outcomes across the life course, with a focus on sexual and reproductive health. Issues regarding GBV in highly vulnerable populations (including for example conflict-affected, adolescent, LGBTQ populations) are discussed to gain an understanding of GBV as gender justice and social justice issue, more broadly. Promising interventions for the primary and secondary prevention of GVB victimization and perpetration are emphasized with a focus on evidence based on rigorous impact evaluations. Ethical issues in conducting research on GBV are thoroughly addressed, enabling students to conduct their own research following international ethical guidelines. Legal frameworks and grass-roots social movements also are discussed. By the end of the course, students will have developed the ability to evaluate critically and to identify the relationships between theory, evidence, and practice related to gender-based violence in lower-income settings.

Second Year Paper (SOC 590R) - Karen Hegtvedt

Tuesday 2:00-5:00

Tarbutton Hall 206

Course Description:

The primary goal of this seminar is to facilitate completion of the second-year research paper requirement. Towards that end, the seminar instructs students regarding conceptual and pragmatic issues associated with empirical research. We will address fundamental issues of: the construction of literature reviews; development of a theoretical argument; the translation of theoretical questions and concerns into empirical projects; design and implementation of empirical studies; analyses and presentation of results; and discussion of the implications of results. Assignments pertaining to students’ own empirical research projects will complement dialogue about each issue to ensure progress on their respective projects. Feedback on the assignments (from classmates and the instructor) provide a means for students to improve their projects and make the expected substantial progress toward the completion of their research papers.

Particulars:

Readings TBA

(Near) Weekly assignments focused on components of research papers

Peer feedback on other students’ assignments

Theory Construction (SOC 741) - Bin Xu

Thursday 2:00-5:00

Tarbutton Hall 104

Course Description:

This course helps graduate students generate and develop theoretical ideas for their research in a conscious and systematic way. Students read and learn philosophy of social science to get a clear sense of the epistemologies and ontologies out there in social science and to reflect on the often unstated assumptions in their thinking. The students also read materials about theorizing and apply the theorizing agenda to their research topics. This course adopts a workshop-style pedagogy, which can provide students with hands-on experience and feedback from their fellow students and instructor.

Required text:

  •  ISBN: 978-0691155227 Swedberg, Richard. 2014. The Art of Social Theory. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press.
  •  ISBN 9780230242609 Benton, Ted, and Ian Craib. 2011. Philosophy of Social Science. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  •  ISBN 978-0804791090 Swedberg, Richard, ed. 2014. Theorizing in Social Science: The Context of Discovery. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. 
  • ISBN 978-0393978148 Abbott, Andrew Delano. 2004. Methods of discovery: heuristics for the social sciences. New York: W.W. Norton & Co. 
  • ISBN 978-0335208845 Delany,Gerard and Strydon,Piet. Philosophies of Social Science: The Classic and Contemporary Readings. Open Press.

Sociology of Education (SOC 759R) - Cassidy Puckett

Monday 1:00-4:00

Tarbutton Hall 206

Course Description:

This course focuses on education and its relationship to social inequality. The goals of the course are to: 1) provide students with a foundation in the literature on formal and informal education and 2) prepare students to engage in their own research in education. To do so, we will first look at educational experiences from pre-school through through college to consider how social class, race, gender, and sexuality both organize and are organized by these educational environments—and the factors that contribute to inequalities in learning, educational attainment, and life outcomes such as earnings and health. In this survey, we will also consider several issues such as racial segregation and desegregation, tracking, school choice, technological interventions, and more. As we investigate these issues, we will attend to the theoretical, substantive, methodological, and political considerations that concern the study of education. Finally, to apply these ideas, students will engage in a research project in education using a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods approach.

Teaching Sociology (SOC 767) - Frank Lechner

Wednesday 2:00-5:00

Tarbutton Hall 206

Course Description:

Through discussion of major issues in teaching and with a variety of exercises, this seminar will help you prepare for your first teaching assignment and enhance your effectiveness as a teacher.

Directed Studies (SOC 597R or SOC 797R)

These offer credit for individualized work with a given faculty member.

Please consult with your advisor and / or Dr. Ellen Idler, our Director of Graduate Studies), about enrollment.

MA Research (SOC 599R or PhD Research (SOC 799R)

These offer credit for ongoing research overseen by a given faculty member.

Please consult with your advisor and / or Dr. Ellen Idler, our Director of Graduate Studies), about enrollment.

Teaching Assistantships (TATT 605SOC & TATT 610SOC)

These offer credit for participation in assistantships (TATT 605C) and for teaching one's own class (TATT 610SOC).

Read more about these credits here.